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I did some photography work, documenting some of the beautiful paper sculptures for fellow UNIT 3 artist Hormazd Narielwalla, which got published in spoon magazine. Head on over to check it out.

I did some photography work, documenting some of the beautiful paper sculptures for fellow UNIT 3 artist Hormazd Narielwalla, which got published in spoon magazine. Head on over to check it out.

cinephilearchive:

A fantastic documentary on one of the key people in the history of cinema. A portrait of the pioneer photographer, forefather of cinema, showman, murderer — Eadweard Muybridge was a Victorian enigma. He was born and died in Kingston upon Thames, but did his most famous work in California — freezing time and starting it up again, so that for the first time people could see how a racing horse’s legs moved. He went on to animate the movements of naked ladies, wrestlers, athletes, elephants, cockatoos and his own naked body, projecting his images publicly with a machine he invented and astounding audiences worldwide with the first flickerings of cinema. Alan Yentob follows in Muybridge’s footsteps as he makes — and often changes — his name, and sets off to kill his young wife’s lover. With Andy Serkis as Muybridge.

This short excerpt from Gary Leva’s feature documentary Fog City Mavericks tells the story of San Francisco artist Eadweard Muybridge, who invented motion pictures. To see the entire film, watch 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

Eadweard Muybridge: The Stanford Years 1872–82 (1972). Catalogue for the exhibition held at Stanford University Museum of Art in 1972. Edited by Anita Ventura Mozley. Publisher Department of Art, Stanford University, 1972. 136 pages via Archive.org
Download (60 MB, no OCR)


//

cinephilearchive:

A fantastic documentary on one of the key people in the history of cinema. A portrait of the pioneer photographer, forefather of cinema, showman, murderer — Eadweard Muybridge was a Victorian enigma. He was born and died in Kingston upon Thames, but did his most famous work in California — freezing time and starting it up again, so that for the first time people could see how a racing horse’s legs moved. He went on to animate the movements of naked ladies, wrestlers, athletes, elephants, cockatoos and his own naked body, projecting his images publicly with a machine he invented and astounding audiences worldwide with the first flickerings of cinema. Alan Yentob follows in Muybridge’s footsteps as he makes — and often changes — his name, and sets off to kill his young wife’s lover. With Andy Serkis as Muybridge.

This short excerpt from Gary Leva’s feature documentary Fog City Mavericks tells the story of San Francisco artist Eadweard Muybridge, who invented motion pictures. To see the entire film, watch 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

Eadweard Muybridge: The Stanford Years 1872–82 (1972). Catalogue for the exhibition held at Stanford University Museum of Art in 1972. Edited by Anita Ventura Mozley. Publisher Department of Art, Stanford University, 1972. 136 pages via Archive.org

Download (60 MB, no OCR)

(Source: cinephilearchive, via cinephilearchive)

Jerry Saltz is doing a reddit AMA

Unfortunately I missed out on asking a question, but good to know the line up of Reddit AMA’s.

(Source: mossfull)

A studio experiment playing around with texture and line.

A studio experiment playing around with texture and line.

Drawings from recent class at Bethnal green life drawing last night.

Drawings from recent class at Bethnal green life drawing last night.

Some more of the textural drawing and painting experiments that I’ve been playing around with.

Some more of the textural drawing and painting experiments that I’ve been playing around with.

Playing around with texture, printing and drawing. Recently, I’ve been trying to explore how to visualise texture, using rubbings. I got a bit frustrated with just using things link leaves, and drain grills, and had this wonderful idea to create a textured painting. I have this acrylic light modeling paste, which I’m using to build up textures. Trying to figure out through this process how to differentiate between figure and landscape.

The picture is of my brother and sister playing on a beach in Spain.

Playing around with texture, printing and drawing. Recently, I’ve been trying to explore how to visualise texture, using rubbings. I got a bit frustrated with just using things link leaves, and drain grills, and had this wonderful idea to create a textured painting. I have this acrylic light modeling paste, which I’m using to build up textures. Trying to figure out through this process how to differentiate between figure and landscape.

The picture is of my brother and sister playing on a beach in Spain.

An interesting TED talk by Wayne McGregor, talking about his choreographic process, and how its informed by working with dancers and improvisation.

I’m doing a bit of research into the history of dance and video, and stumbled accross “Thanatopsis” (1962), an interesting short film by Ed Emshwiller

Some of my work that i created earlier this year was featured on the FAD magazine website! It was a couple of months ago, but i only just foun out, whilst googling myself. It was for an artist I gave at my last exhibition; In all directions at DegreeArt, along with Luis, Henry, Silvia and Abigail.

Some of my work that i created earlier this year was featured on the FAD magazine website! It was a couple of months ago, but i only just foun out, whilst googling myself. It was for an artist I gave at my last exhibition; In all directions at DegreeArt, along with Luis, Henry, Silvia and Abigail.

Layering. How do you draw a whole picture that tells a narrative, or how do you draw a picture that has parts that might read like a narrative?


With the layered drawing, I have a background that I want to build up diffferent opaque layers. Problem encontered, how does each layer physically hold itself?


Wire. Started playing with wire as a structure to hold the flimsy parts of the drawing (I’m experimenting with wax paper for opaquness, but it doens’t hold a stable state if extended). How do I hide the structure? Or how could I integrate the structure so that it becomes part of the drawing?

Cutting edges that fold behind the wire, after I glue it on. Problem: using wax paper, you can see the wire through the opaque wax paper. Possible solution, painting with guache, the paint dries quite solid and not seethrough, enabling a possibility of no see through parts.

What does it mean to cut out holes in the background (yellow image).

Layering. How do you draw a whole picture that tells a narrative, or how do you draw a picture that has parts that might read like a narrative?

Background, Samuel Overington 2013

With the layered drawing, I have a background that I want to build up diffferent opaque layers. Problem encontered, how does each layer physically hold itself?

Wire. Started playing with wire as a structure to hold the flimsy parts of the drawing (I’m experimenting with wax paper for opaquness, but it doens’t hold a stable state if extended). How do I hide the structure? Or how could I integrate the structure so that it becomes part of the drawing?

Cutting edges that fold behind the wire, after I glue it on. Problem: using wax paper, you can see the wire through the opaque wax paper. Possible solution, painting with guache, the paint dries quite solid and not seethrough, enabling a possibility of no see through parts.

What does it mean to cut out holes in the background (yellow image).

During the lab, Samuel lead some exercises exploring movement and mark making, stemming from his own practice as a drawer. The lab was presented with several points of interest which have come up from observing and drawing Contact Improv.

Beginning with a breathing exercise we explored how to connect the breath with a moveable point of focus. Bringing forth from the imagination a point which we explored how to manipulate it with the breath.

We then explored how to give properties - weight, mass and volume and explored through improvised movement how to manipulate this point around the body, beginning with inside – with the questions of how to follow lines within the body of circulation, paying particular attention to where the point physically is, and what the point was moving through – flesh, muscle, joints and bone.

Introducing weight, mass and volume as separate properties to the point, we explored how these properties could work autonomously to our own improvised movement with the following questions:


How does the movement of the point effect our movement when we increase the size of the point, but keep its weight (or mass) the same as a small point. Observation notes: this made movement look stunted or broken, like there was something keeping us from making a full gesture.


How is movement effected when we decrease the size to a very tiny point, but increase the energy of it moving within the body. Observation notes: rapid changes of direction, fidgety movement.


How is movement effected when point takes on weight, and joints take on a magnetic or sticky feel. Observation notes: swinging around the point within your body like a ball, catching it in the bottom of limbs. Flowing and more released movement.


What happens when point is allowed to extend outside the body, increasing in mass, but not size. This also introduced the interaction of people, through observation, becoming aware of other peoples revolving points.


We then explored this theme of a point with properties in a new exercise, exploring the passing or throwing of the point between partners – as if the point was an imaginary ball, reading from your partners experience of how big, how heavy, the point is, as well as how much energy the point was given in throwing, and catching accordingly. Observation notes: people introduced a real ball to simulate what it was like, and then played with real and non real.



In another experiment, we explored through non-visual experience, how gesture and movement can be ‘experienced’ and recreated. Assembling into pairs, one person closed their eyes and touched the other person – watching or experiencing the other persons movement, as they made a simple gesture, which the person with their eyes closed would then have to replicate with their own bodies the gesture as best they had just experienced. Observation notes: often people though that it was easier to keep their eyes closed in order to recreate the movement.

We then tried this in a large group, passing the gesture around everyone, and then watched the evolution of the movement at the end.



The last part of the lab was left pen for people t explore the relationship of physical line and movement, where we set out a large piece of paper and some chalks, and split the group into two. The first group became the movers and the second the drawers. The movers explored again how a point with various properties would effect their movement (heavy, light, big, small, sticky, slippery… etc) and the drawers explored how to follow the this point with a line made by drawing chalk on the large piece of paper. The group then swapped after five minutes so everyone got a go which then led into our own exploration of the materials.

Observation notes and comments from the end:


There was a difficulty in understanding the terminology that I was using, which led to a difficulty understanding what I meant by point, and how it could effect our movement.


It was interesting when left at the end, figuring out and playing with movement of being a drawer, questioning weather the drawer was recreating someone else’s movement


Interestingly – discussion whilst eating turned to photography and the use of peoples faces, and what they felt appropriate within the context of certain environments. I have had little or no questioning whilst drawing.



Check out my facebook page for the ful album of photographs of the works https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.533307486719309.1073741825.255178384532222&type=1

During the lab, Samuel lead some exercises exploring movement and mark making, stemming from his own practice as a drawer. The lab was presented with several points of interest which have come up from observing and drawing Contact Improv.

Beginning with a breathing exercise we explored how to connect the breath with a moveable point of focus. Bringing forth from the imagination a point which we explored how to manipulate it with the breath.

We then explored how to give properties - weight, mass and volume and explored through improvised movement how to manipulate this point around the body, beginning with inside – with the questions of how to follow lines within the body of circulation, paying particular attention to where the point physically is, and what the point was moving through – flesh, muscle, joints and bone.

Introducing weight, mass and volume as separate properties to the point, we explored how these properties could work autonomously to our own improvised movement with the following questions:

  • How does the movement of the point effect our movement when we increase the size of the point, but keep its weight (or mass) the same as a small point. Observation notes: this made movement look stunted or broken, like there was something keeping us from making a full gesture.

  • How is movement effected when we decrease the size to a very tiny point, but increase the energy of it moving within the body. Observation notes: rapid changes of direction, fidgety movement.

  • How is movement effected when point takes on weight, and joints take on a magnetic or sticky feel. Observation notes: swinging around the point within your body like a ball, catching it in the bottom of limbs. Flowing and more released movement.

  • What happens when point is allowed to extend outside the body, increasing in mass, but not size. This also introduced the interaction of people, through observation, becoming aware of other peoples revolving points.

We then explored this theme of a point with properties in a new exercise, exploring the passing or throwing of the point between partners – as if the point was an imaginary ball, reading from your partners experience of how big, how heavy, the point is, as well as how much energy the point was given in throwing, and catching accordingly. Observation notes: people introduced a real ball to simulate what it was like, and then played with real and non real.



In another experiment, we explored through non-visual experience, how gesture and movement can be ‘experienced’ and recreated. Assembling into pairs, one person closed their eyes and touched the other person – watching or experiencing the other persons movement, as they made a simple gesture, which the person with their eyes closed would then have to replicate with their own bodies the gesture as best they had just experienced. Observation notes: often people though that it was easier to keep their eyes closed in order to recreate the movement.

We then tried this in a large group, passing the gesture around everyone, and then watched the evolution of the movement at the end.



The last part of the lab was left pen for people t explore the relationship of physical line and movement, where we set out a large piece of paper and some chalks, and split the group into two. The first group became the movers and the second the drawers. The movers explored again how a point with various properties would effect their movement (heavy, light, big, small, sticky, slippery… etc) and the drawers explored how to follow the this point with a line made by drawing chalk on the large piece of paper. The group then swapped after five minutes so everyone got a go which then led into our own exploration of the materials.

Observation notes and comments from the end:

  • There was a difficulty in understanding the terminology that I was using, which led to a difficulty understanding what I meant by point, and how it could effect our movement.

  • It was interesting when left at the end, figuring out and playing with movement of being a drawer, questioning weather the drawer was recreating someone else’s movement

  • Interestingly – discussion whilst eating turned to photography and the use of peoples faces, and what they felt appropriate within the context of certain environments. I have had little or no questioning whilst drawing.



Check out my facebook page for the ful album of photographs of the works https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.533307486719309.1073741825.255178384532222&type=1

I did some photography work, documenting some of the beautiful paper sculptures for fellow UNIT 3 artist Hormazd Narielwalla, which got published in spoon magazine. Head on over to check it out.

I did some photography work, documenting some of the beautiful paper sculptures for fellow UNIT 3 artist Hormazd Narielwalla, which got published in spoon magazine. Head on over to check it out.

cinephilearchive:

A fantastic documentary on one of the key people in the history of cinema. A portrait of the pioneer photographer, forefather of cinema, showman, murderer — Eadweard Muybridge was a Victorian enigma. He was born and died in Kingston upon Thames, but did his most famous work in California — freezing time and starting it up again, so that for the first time people could see how a racing horse’s legs moved. He went on to animate the movements of naked ladies, wrestlers, athletes, elephants, cockatoos and his own naked body, projecting his images publicly with a machine he invented and astounding audiences worldwide with the first flickerings of cinema. Alan Yentob follows in Muybridge’s footsteps as he makes — and often changes — his name, and sets off to kill his young wife’s lover. With Andy Serkis as Muybridge.

This short excerpt from Gary Leva’s feature documentary Fog City Mavericks tells the story of San Francisco artist Eadweard Muybridge, who invented motion pictures. To see the entire film, watch 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

Eadweard Muybridge: The Stanford Years 1872–82 (1972). Catalogue for the exhibition held at Stanford University Museum of Art in 1972. Edited by Anita Ventura Mozley. Publisher Department of Art, Stanford University, 1972. 136 pages via Archive.org
Download (60 MB, no OCR)


//

cinephilearchive:

A fantastic documentary on one of the key people in the history of cinema. A portrait of the pioneer photographer, forefather of cinema, showman, murderer — Eadweard Muybridge was a Victorian enigma. He was born and died in Kingston upon Thames, but did his most famous work in California — freezing time and starting it up again, so that for the first time people could see how a racing horse’s legs moved. He went on to animate the movements of naked ladies, wrestlers, athletes, elephants, cockatoos and his own naked body, projecting his images publicly with a machine he invented and astounding audiences worldwide with the first flickerings of cinema. Alan Yentob follows in Muybridge’s footsteps as he makes — and often changes — his name, and sets off to kill his young wife’s lover. With Andy Serkis as Muybridge.

This short excerpt from Gary Leva’s feature documentary Fog City Mavericks tells the story of San Francisco artist Eadweard Muybridge, who invented motion pictures. To see the entire film, watch 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

Eadweard Muybridge: The Stanford Years 1872–82 (1972). Catalogue for the exhibition held at Stanford University Museum of Art in 1972. Edited by Anita Ventura Mozley. Publisher Department of Art, Stanford University, 1972. 136 pages via Archive.org

Download (60 MB, no OCR)

(Source: cinephilearchive, via cinephilearchive)

Jerry Saltz is doing a reddit AMA

Unfortunately I missed out on asking a question, but good to know the line up of Reddit AMA’s.

(Source: mossfull)

A studio experiment playing around with texture and line.

A studio experiment playing around with texture and line.

Drawings from recent class at Bethnal green life drawing last night.

Drawings from recent class at Bethnal green life drawing last night.

Some more of the textural drawing and painting experiments that I’ve been playing around with.

Some more of the textural drawing and painting experiments that I’ve been playing around with.

Playing around with texture, printing and drawing. Recently, I’ve been trying to explore how to visualise texture, using rubbings. I got a bit frustrated with just using things link leaves, and drain grills, and had this wonderful idea to create a textured painting. I have this acrylic light modeling paste, which I’m using to build up textures. Trying to figure out through this process how to differentiate between figure and landscape.

The picture is of my brother and sister playing on a beach in Spain.

Playing around with texture, printing and drawing. Recently, I’ve been trying to explore how to visualise texture, using rubbings. I got a bit frustrated with just using things link leaves, and drain grills, and had this wonderful idea to create a textured painting. I have this acrylic light modeling paste, which I’m using to build up textures. Trying to figure out through this process how to differentiate between figure and landscape.

The picture is of my brother and sister playing on a beach in Spain.

An interesting TED talk by Wayne McGregor, talking about his choreographic process, and how its informed by working with dancers and improvisation.

I’m doing a bit of research into the history of dance and video, and stumbled accross “Thanatopsis” (1962), an interesting short film by Ed Emshwiller

Some of my work that i created earlier this year was featured on the FAD magazine website! It was a couple of months ago, but i only just foun out, whilst googling myself. It was for an artist I gave at my last exhibition; In all directions at DegreeArt, along with Luis, Henry, Silvia and Abigail.

Some of my work that i created earlier this year was featured on the FAD magazine website! It was a couple of months ago, but i only just foun out, whilst googling myself. It was for an artist I gave at my last exhibition; In all directions at DegreeArt, along with Luis, Henry, Silvia and Abigail.

Layering. How do you draw a whole picture that tells a narrative, or how do you draw a picture that has parts that might read like a narrative?


With the layered drawing, I have a background that I want to build up diffferent opaque layers. Problem encontered, how does each layer physically hold itself?


Wire. Started playing with wire as a structure to hold the flimsy parts of the drawing (I’m experimenting with wax paper for opaquness, but it doens’t hold a stable state if extended). How do I hide the structure? Or how could I integrate the structure so that it becomes part of the drawing?

Cutting edges that fold behind the wire, after I glue it on. Problem: using wax paper, you can see the wire through the opaque wax paper. Possible solution, painting with guache, the paint dries quite solid and not seethrough, enabling a possibility of no see through parts.

What does it mean to cut out holes in the background (yellow image).

Layering. How do you draw a whole picture that tells a narrative, or how do you draw a picture that has parts that might read like a narrative?

Background, Samuel Overington 2013

With the layered drawing, I have a background that I want to build up diffferent opaque layers. Problem encontered, how does each layer physically hold itself?

Wire. Started playing with wire as a structure to hold the flimsy parts of the drawing (I’m experimenting with wax paper for opaquness, but it doens’t hold a stable state if extended). How do I hide the structure? Or how could I integrate the structure so that it becomes part of the drawing?

Cutting edges that fold behind the wire, after I glue it on. Problem: using wax paper, you can see the wire through the opaque wax paper. Possible solution, painting with guache, the paint dries quite solid and not seethrough, enabling a possibility of no see through parts.

What does it mean to cut out holes in the background (yellow image).

During the lab, Samuel lead some exercises exploring movement and mark making, stemming from his own practice as a drawer. The lab was presented with several points of interest which have come up from observing and drawing Contact Improv.

Beginning with a breathing exercise we explored how to connect the breath with a moveable point of focus. Bringing forth from the imagination a point which we explored how to manipulate it with the breath.

We then explored how to give properties - weight, mass and volume and explored through improvised movement how to manipulate this point around the body, beginning with inside – with the questions of how to follow lines within the body of circulation, paying particular attention to where the point physically is, and what the point was moving through – flesh, muscle, joints and bone.

Introducing weight, mass and volume as separate properties to the point, we explored how these properties could work autonomously to our own improvised movement with the following questions:


How does the movement of the point effect our movement when we increase the size of the point, but keep its weight (or mass) the same as a small point. Observation notes: this made movement look stunted or broken, like there was something keeping us from making a full gesture.


How is movement effected when we decrease the size to a very tiny point, but increase the energy of it moving within the body. Observation notes: rapid changes of direction, fidgety movement.


How is movement effected when point takes on weight, and joints take on a magnetic or sticky feel. Observation notes: swinging around the point within your body like a ball, catching it in the bottom of limbs. Flowing and more released movement.


What happens when point is allowed to extend outside the body, increasing in mass, but not size. This also introduced the interaction of people, through observation, becoming aware of other peoples revolving points.


We then explored this theme of a point with properties in a new exercise, exploring the passing or throwing of the point between partners – as if the point was an imaginary ball, reading from your partners experience of how big, how heavy, the point is, as well as how much energy the point was given in throwing, and catching accordingly. Observation notes: people introduced a real ball to simulate what it was like, and then played with real and non real.



In another experiment, we explored through non-visual experience, how gesture and movement can be ‘experienced’ and recreated. Assembling into pairs, one person closed their eyes and touched the other person – watching or experiencing the other persons movement, as they made a simple gesture, which the person with their eyes closed would then have to replicate with their own bodies the gesture as best they had just experienced. Observation notes: often people though that it was easier to keep their eyes closed in order to recreate the movement.

We then tried this in a large group, passing the gesture around everyone, and then watched the evolution of the movement at the end.



The last part of the lab was left pen for people t explore the relationship of physical line and movement, where we set out a large piece of paper and some chalks, and split the group into two. The first group became the movers and the second the drawers. The movers explored again how a point with various properties would effect their movement (heavy, light, big, small, sticky, slippery… etc) and the drawers explored how to follow the this point with a line made by drawing chalk on the large piece of paper. The group then swapped after five minutes so everyone got a go which then led into our own exploration of the materials.

Observation notes and comments from the end:


There was a difficulty in understanding the terminology that I was using, which led to a difficulty understanding what I meant by point, and how it could effect our movement.


It was interesting when left at the end, figuring out and playing with movement of being a drawer, questioning weather the drawer was recreating someone else’s movement


Interestingly – discussion whilst eating turned to photography and the use of peoples faces, and what they felt appropriate within the context of certain environments. I have had little or no questioning whilst drawing.



Check out my facebook page for the ful album of photographs of the works https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.533307486719309.1073741825.255178384532222&type=1

During the lab, Samuel lead some exercises exploring movement and mark making, stemming from his own practice as a drawer. The lab was presented with several points of interest which have come up from observing and drawing Contact Improv.

Beginning with a breathing exercise we explored how to connect the breath with a moveable point of focus. Bringing forth from the imagination a point which we explored how to manipulate it with the breath.

We then explored how to give properties - weight, mass and volume and explored through improvised movement how to manipulate this point around the body, beginning with inside – with the questions of how to follow lines within the body of circulation, paying particular attention to where the point physically is, and what the point was moving through – flesh, muscle, joints and bone.

Introducing weight, mass and volume as separate properties to the point, we explored how these properties could work autonomously to our own improvised movement with the following questions:

  • How does the movement of the point effect our movement when we increase the size of the point, but keep its weight (or mass) the same as a small point. Observation notes: this made movement look stunted or broken, like there was something keeping us from making a full gesture.

  • How is movement effected when we decrease the size to a very tiny point, but increase the energy of it moving within the body. Observation notes: rapid changes of direction, fidgety movement.

  • How is movement effected when point takes on weight, and joints take on a magnetic or sticky feel. Observation notes: swinging around the point within your body like a ball, catching it in the bottom of limbs. Flowing and more released movement.

  • What happens when point is allowed to extend outside the body, increasing in mass, but not size. This also introduced the interaction of people, through observation, becoming aware of other peoples revolving points.

We then explored this theme of a point with properties in a new exercise, exploring the passing or throwing of the point between partners – as if the point was an imaginary ball, reading from your partners experience of how big, how heavy, the point is, as well as how much energy the point was given in throwing, and catching accordingly. Observation notes: people introduced a real ball to simulate what it was like, and then played with real and non real.



In another experiment, we explored through non-visual experience, how gesture and movement can be ‘experienced’ and recreated. Assembling into pairs, one person closed their eyes and touched the other person – watching or experiencing the other persons movement, as they made a simple gesture, which the person with their eyes closed would then have to replicate with their own bodies the gesture as best they had just experienced. Observation notes: often people though that it was easier to keep their eyes closed in order to recreate the movement.

We then tried this in a large group, passing the gesture around everyone, and then watched the evolution of the movement at the end.



The last part of the lab was left pen for people t explore the relationship of physical line and movement, where we set out a large piece of paper and some chalks, and split the group into two. The first group became the movers and the second the drawers. The movers explored again how a point with various properties would effect their movement (heavy, light, big, small, sticky, slippery… etc) and the drawers explored how to follow the this point with a line made by drawing chalk on the large piece of paper. The group then swapped after five minutes so everyone got a go which then led into our own exploration of the materials.

Observation notes and comments from the end:

  • There was a difficulty in understanding the terminology that I was using, which led to a difficulty understanding what I meant by point, and how it could effect our movement.

  • It was interesting when left at the end, figuring out and playing with movement of being a drawer, questioning weather the drawer was recreating someone else’s movement

  • Interestingly – discussion whilst eating turned to photography and the use of peoples faces, and what they felt appropriate within the context of certain environments. I have had little or no questioning whilst drawing.



Check out my facebook page for the ful album of photographs of the works https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.533307486719309.1073741825.255178384532222&type=1

About:

Pencils and Pens.
Artist based in London's East End, drawing dance, contact improvisation and movement based practices.

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